When a Root Canal Is Necessary for You

When people hear the words “root canal,” they often feel horrified. Actually, root canals play an important role in repairing decaying teeth and preventing their losses. What’s more, the treatment of root canal can prevent bacteria and poisons from entering the bloodstream through infected teeth and cause other health problems.

Removing Pulp

The interior of each tooth is filled with pulp and nerve networks. If the pulp is infected or sustains damage, it can start deteriorating. After this happens, bacteria can begin to grow and multiplying. Over time, abscess can form in an infected area.

If the infection is left not checked, a patient may experience swelling in the face area and even a hole in the side of the infected teeth. During the root canal, pulp is extracted from the interior of the dental, preventing further infection or bacterial infiltration into the bloodstream.

Procedure

Before treatment begins, your dentist will take X-rays from the affected teeth. The purpose of the X-ray is to identify the locations of infection in and around the bone. After anesthesia has numb, your dentist will drill a hole in the teeth. This is an access point where pulp and bacteria are extracted. The gear cavity is then eroded by a number of small files before the water is used to remove the remaining particles.